Geek v Climate Scientist

CombinedUAHRSSHadCrutGISSAMOPDOCET

Climate Scientist: I want a tool to examine Climate Temperatures.

Geek: How do you define Climate?

Climate Scientist: Longer than 10 years or so.

Geek: So you want a tool that will show how the planet’s temperature responds in periods of more than 10 years or so?

Climate Scientist: Yes.

Geek: Well basic theory says that a Low Pass filter with a corner frequency of 15 years will do exactly what you want.

Climate Scientist: But that’s not complicated enough and anyway that does not show me what I like to see. It says that there are natural oscillations in the signal and my theory says they don’t exist.

Geek: ??????????

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4 thoughts on “Geek v Climate Scientist

  1. RichardLH – I happened to catch the discussion about UAH vs land-based temp measures. It might be simply that the UAH measurement is pretty high above land. If you look at the UAH ( http://ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov/amsutemps/amsutemps.pl ) at different heights, you see that the annual temp will flat-line at a certain height. The annual change is more pronounced the nearer the ground. Above the flat-line altitude, the annual temperature profile reverses, getting cooler for NH summer, warmer in winter. One would have to download the data from UAH to verify for sure, but – just a thought. I really don’t have time to do that.

  2. Jim2:

    If you look at the combined page you will see that, in general, all of the temperatures sources since 1979 are very close to one another. However, there is still the problem that, in general, the satellite series, UAH and RSS, are trending (over the 34 years that is available) slightly lower that the thermometer series, HadCrut and GISS, over the same time period. This state of affairs cannot continue for ever so, sooner or later, one or the other will have to issue a correction. Which do you think that it will be and why?

  3. AJ: Thanks for that (particularly the R code). I’ll have a look at it and see how applying some filters to the data may provide some insight into what happens.

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